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Served 50,000 corporate users, 600,000 foreign talents, and 190,000 foreign resumes It has reached international talents from 123 countries around the world, and has accumulated rich experience in helping international talents work and live.
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Executive search service
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More than 10 years of headhunting service experience
A professional headhunting team with 10 years of headhunting experience. At the same time, an overseas business department was established to expand overseas cooperation channels and help Chinese companies recruit global expats.
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Based on the accumulation of our website for many years, we have obtained a rich global expats resource pool. The nationality of expats spans the globe, with focus in Europe, United States and in the Asian-Pacific regions.
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    Business in Chinese and Chinese Culture

    China is one of the world's major economic powers. Additionally, the market is conducive to foreign development because to its economic, political, and social stability, as well as its government's pro-growth policies and many chances for expansion. However, there are obstacles to overcome while doing business in any foreign nation, including China. Although the corporate world is gradually embracing western management practices, traditional components are still deeply intertwined with how transactions are conducted. If you want to perform well in China, you need to learn about Chinese culture. Let's analyze how various elements of Chinese culture impact the economic climate of the nation.

    Supervision of Workers

    It is certain that you will need to recruit locals to assist you realize your company goals in China. There are, nevertheless, stringent regulations in place for foreign enterprises that need to hire locals.

    Once you have hired the necessary personnel, understanding the Chinese work culture can help you effectively manage your staff. The importance of one's position in the hierarchy and one's work title are two of the most prominent features of society. The junior staff members have a lot of respect for the senior staff members. They have respect for managerial positions and authority, and they believe that addressing superiors directly is rude. In addition, workers who speak out in meetings are often seen as egotistical. Consequently, you'll need to conduct one-on-one conversations with others if you want to learn more, as well as hear their perspectives on various issues.

    It's also important to remember the importance of'saving face' while interacting with others, which is avoiding saying or doing anything that might damage another person's respect, esteem, or power. Workers are not allowed to publicly challenge their superiors or peers. Similarly, supervisors never point out workers' errors in front of others. Consequences and criticism are delivered one-on-one.

    Official gatherings

    In China, personal connections are crucial. The decision-making process is also time-consuming because of the need to adhere to formal protocols and respect established authority structures. You can't expect your Chinese business partners to be happy if you try to skip steps. As a result, you should prepare to meet with partners and interested parties many times before the agreement is finalized. Invitations to dinner, cocktails, or sporting events are all fair game.

    Keep in mind that being on time is highly important in China, so keep that in mind while attending meetings. If you think you may be late, please let the individuals you're meeting know as soon as possible. Do not wear bright colors and instead go for a more formal outfit. Your team's hierarchy should be reflected in the order of who arrives at meetings first and who speaks. If you're feeling hesitant, it's best to follow the lead of your hosts. At addition, it's polite to use people's full names and titles when addressing them in the meeting.

    Meetings often include exchanging business cards; while doing so, it's important to pay close attention and treat the card's owner with the same level of respect you'd like to be treated with. When handing out or receiving business cards, use either hands. Observe a moment of silence and have everyone sit down before putting it away. Keep it out of your back pocket, since the Chinese could see it as a sign that you're about to sit on their faces. Make sure the recipient of your business card sees the name and contact information. Having them printed in both English and Chinese is a wise move as wellTalking

    Pay careful attention to what your Chinese peers are saying and doing when you communicate with them. To the contrary, a nod of the head does not imply agreement in Chinese culture, and vice versa. Pay attention to any hesitancy in the respondent's tone, and think again before jumping to conclusions about the answers you get. Also, negative responses need to be handled delicately so as not to come out as disrespectful. And remember that turning down someone's offer too quickly might come out as a rejection of them as a person. It's also rude to cut someone off mid-sentence. Make sure you don't cut somebody off while they're talking; it's considered rude in China.

    In the form of favors and gift

    Chinese corporate culture places a premium on personal connections. Therefore, the goals of negotiations should include fostering loyalty, harmony, and long-term corporate partnerships. Several exchanges of gifts and favors may be necessary to establish these connections. However, this exemplifies the idea of reciprocity. You are expected to repay favors and presents if you get them. Gifts should be chosen with the notion of "saving face" in mind, so choose something that won't need too much effort on the recipient's part to return the favor. Maintain an air of professionalism and steer clear of lavish presents that might be seen as attempts at bribery.