Making it easier for foreigners to live and work in China

Over 180,000 global expats have registered on our site
videoShow

Helping Chinese enterprises recruit global talent

We've listed over 30,000 positions since we started
Today's Hot Jobs
bannerIcon
Scan QR code to download HiredChina App
Platform advantages
Multi-Platform Sync
While you can check new job posts on HiredChina.com, new job info will also be posted on our Facebook page, Linkedin page, Twitter account, as well as our WeChat account GICexpat.
Free Functions + Paid Convenience
While you can use all the functions for free, you can pay a small amount of money to gain triple attention from the employers.
Instant Interaction
By clicking ‘Apply’at the lower left of job page, your intention will be automatically sent to the recruiter. At the same time, you can also use the instant message system to communicate with the recruiter.
advantages
Executive search service
advantages
More than 10 years of headhunting service experience
A professional headhunting team with 10 years of headhunting experience. At the same time, an overseas business department was established to expand overseas cooperation channels and help Chinese companies recruit global expats.
Rich global expats reservation
Based on the accumulation of our website for many years, we have obtained a rich global expats resource pool. The nationality of expats spans the globe, with focus in Europe, United States and in the Asian-Pacific regions.
Focusing on industry segments
Focused service companies / industries include domestic high-tech companies, e-commerce companies, gaming companies, medical / pharmaceutical industries, manufacturing and education industries with overseas talent demand.
advantages
Partners
coporate
coporate
coporate
coporate
coporate
jobs
coporate
coporate
coporate
coporate
coporate
coporate
coporate
coporate
coporate
coporate
coporate
coporate
coporate
coporate
coporate
coporate
coporate
Hiredchina uses some cutting-edge code, which makes it incompatible with some IE browsers. If you see this, we suggest you switch to Google/firefox/safari browser to visit our website.
hiredchina

HiredChina.com 在华外国人才网 - 招聘外国人 - 最多外国人使用的求职平台,成功发布的职位将每日同步到Facebook/teitter/Linkedin,并由全国第一的英文微信大号GICexpat推送给20W外国粉丝!

    How do I get a teaching job in China?

    The most important thing I took away from my first few months in China and years living here is that knowing why you're coming, where you're going, and what sort of institution you're entering is crucial. You can usually decipher this code by knowing the three points below.

    Location

    Looking for a teaching job in China from England, I fell into a trap that many newcomers go into. In my opinion, China was one big mystery and adventure, therefore I searched for “a teaching job in China.” I didn't realize that, as in the UK, teaching jobs varied greatly depending on location. Just because I was given a job didn't guarantee the location was perfect for me.

    When I initially began teaching in China in the early 2000s, I accepted a position in Dawufeng, a little industrial town an hour away from Tianjin. I was the sole English speaker in town, and the next expat was at least an hour distant.

    While this may be wonderful for others, it was a huge obstacle to my pleasure. I probably wouldn't have accepted the job if I had done more study on the area.

    gov't

    Even though my social life in Dawufeng was less than ideal, the challenges I experienced were nothing compared to those I faced at work. I taught in public elementary and middle schools with over 40 pupils each class.

    In elementary school I had an English-speaking assistance, but in middle school I was entirely alone. Even the Chinese instructors designated to teach English could only achieve the bare essentials, which is why they needed me. The entire thing made me feel overwhelmed and just miserable.

    Foreign instructors working in China's public schools and colleges, particularly in less developed areas, have similar stories. But everything is not lost. The position in Dawufeng was plainly not for me, but it may have been for another foreign instructor. Maybe he was more patient, liked his own company, or thrived when pushed out of his comfort zone.

    Before working in a public school in China, consider the holidays and the pay. Public school pay are often minimal, particularly in second and third tier cities or rural areas. Universities pay a bit more than schools, and both commonly include flats, which frees up a lot of money. Remember that living costs are cheaper in less developed areas.

    In exchange for low pay, Chinese public schools give generous vacations, frequently spanning three summer months and several weeks around Spring Festival. This allows international instructors to travel across China and the area.

    In China, there are two sorts of foreign instructors. The first are inexperienced instructors who value vacation time and flexibility above pay. The second type is respectable instructors who really wish to improve China's grassroots education system. These folks were probably better instructors in their native countries than I was in Dawufeng. They would also like being “immersed” in Chinese culture and language.

    Privé

    Private schools, foreign schools, and language training centers are available in China. Educators have more expectations on them than students. Workers at training centers put forth their best effort late at night, on weekends, and on holidays.

    This area attracts people willing to work harder for greater money. For their part, several of these private schools and firms have evolved into huge organizations, able to provide high salaries and true career development prospects that match those in the West. This sector tends to draw mid-career and older educators wishing to grow or establish themselves. As instructors gain experience in China, they generally move from the lower end of the market to the more paid top end.

    My Dawufeng experience taught me that everyone has different reasons for traveling to China to teach, and I was in a bad position since I didn't understand mine and the variations in the jobs available. To become a teacher in China, one must first identify why they are going and then choose a career, location, and institution that represents this.