International marketing talents recruitment: special session

Marketing Talents - China Opportunities

Helping Chinese companies locate international talents

We've listed over 34,000 positions since we started
bannerIcon
Scan QR code to download HiredChina App
Platform advantages
The current size of the site
Served 50,000 corporate users, 600,000 foreign talents, and 190,000 foreign resumes It has reached international talents from 123 countries around the world, and has accumulated rich experience in helping international talents work and live.
Multi-Platform Sync
While you can check new job posts on HiredChina.com, new job info will also be posted on our Facebook page, Linkedin page, Twitter account, as well as our WeChat account GICexpat.
Free Functions + Paid Convenience
While you can use all the functions for free, you can pay a small amount of money to gain triple attention from the employers.
Instant Interaction
By clicking ‘Apply’at the lower left of job page, your intention will be automatically sent to the recruiter. At the same time, you can also use the instant message system to communicate with the recruiter.
advantages
Executive search service
advantages
More than 10 years of headhunting service experience
A professional headhunting team with 10 years of headhunting experience. At the same time, an overseas business department was established to expand overseas cooperation channels and help Chinese companies recruit global expats.
Rich global expats reservation
Based on the accumulation of our website for many years, we have obtained a rich global expats resource pool. The nationality of expats spans the globe, with focus in Europe, United States and in the Asian-Pacific regions.
Focusing on industry segments
Focused service companies / industries include domestic high-tech companies, e-commerce companies, gaming companies, medical / pharmaceutical industries, manufacturing and education industries with overseas talent demand.
advantages
Partners
comapny
comapny
comapny
comapny
comapny
comapny
comapny
comapny
comapny
comapny
comapny
comapny
comapny
comapny
comapny
comapny
Hiredchina uses some cutting-edge code, which makes it incompatible with some IE browsers. If you see this, we suggest you switch to Google/firefox/safari browser to visit our website.
hiredchina

HiredChina.com 安仕达国际 - 招聘外国人 - 最多外国人使用的求职平台,成功发布的职位将每日同步到Facebook/teitter/Linkedin,并由全国第一的英文微信大号GICexpat推送给20W外国粉丝!

    Learning Chinese

    The ideal approach to study Chinese is with a Chinese instructor, especially in individual one-on-one classes; yet, it may be difficult for Chinese teachers to be entirely honest about the difficulties their pupils may encounter. That doesn't mean your Chinese instructor is intentionally being dishonest with you, but they may be exaggerating the ease with which you can pick up the language.

    That you cannot become proficient in three months.

    It's no secret that Chinese is a tough language to master. However, it is also uncommon for Chinese language schools to overestimate their students' ability to achieve "fluency" in the language. You can't merely make educated guesses about the meanings of Chinese words, as you can with languages like French and German, which are more closely connected to English than Chinese is. This implies that you will need to put in a lot of time studying and reviewing in order to achieve even a basic level of fluency. Consider our advice: If you have an idea of how many months of study you'll need to achieve fluency, double that number. This process will take that long.

    The Chinese culture places a premium on saving and investing for the future.

    Just like studying any other language, Chinese demands time and effort every day. One study session at a time will get you there; for example, you may challenge yourself to learn ten new characters every day or to conduct a five-minute conversation in Chinese with someone else.

    Putting in this type of consistent effort on a daily basis is like saving money over time for your Chinese studies, with each day putting you that much closer to your goal. If they want to keep their pupils from growing bored, Chinese instructors may often rush through a variety of language themes in one lecture and assign homework that builds on material taught in the previous class. Therefore, as a student, it is your responsibility to regularly review previously covered material. Invest some time into making sure you have a firm grasp on every term and character. It's not simply your prior projects that count, though. If you want to get the most out of your Chinese classes, reading the materials before you enter the classroom is a must. You will never master Chinese until you practice like this every day.

    It is not necessary to memorize every single letter and symbol you encounter. Consider your options.

    I've previously told you that putting in the time and effort required to learn Chinese will pay off in the long run, but that doesn't mean you can't use reasonable short-cuts. Although Chinese educators are usually adamant that their pupils memorize every single word of the textbook, the sheer volume of memorization may be exhausting. Instead, it's preferable to focus on memorizing the foundational letters and phrases that appear regularly. Putting in the additional effort now may seem like a waste of time, but it's really a long-term investment (see point 2) that will save you a ton of time later on. If you're having trouble getting started, reference online lists like the frequency and vocabulary lists provided here. If the length of the characters seems insurmountable, you may understand their meaning by first identifying their constituent parts. Gradually, you'll notice that you're grasping the majority of what you read.

    You probably won't ever pass for a native Chinese speaker.

    This is perhaps the most difficult secret to embrace, and while some Chinese students get very near, it's crucial that they recognize this before setting their sights too high. Native Chinese speakers and those who have made China their permanent home nonetheless make mistakes sometimes. The key point to keep in mind is that none of this is relevant. As a result, there is no such thing as a standard pronunciation of Chinese and there is no such thing as a native speaker of Chinese. You may relax knowing that native Chinese speakers also struggle to utilize "perfect" Mandarin.