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    Gift Giving in Chinese Culture

    Chinese culture has its own set of "rules" when it comes to gift-giving, just like any other culture. As a newcomer, it might be difficult to find out these traditions on your own.

    Using this guide, you'll be able to learn some fundamental Chinese cultural gift-giving dos and don'ts. However, there are a few fundamental things that you should be aware of so that you may completely immerse yourself in the culture and experience it as authentically as possible.

    Gift-giving in Chinese culture: what to do and what not to do

    Whether you're a foreigner or a traveler, there are a few things to bear in mind when you present a gift.

    Don't Forget To Change Your Gifts To Fit The Occasion:

    You're expected to present a gift on a variety of occasions, both professionally and personally. You'll be giving gifts to a wide variety of folks over the holiday season.

    The 100-day "birthday" of a kid or the first time you meet your partner's parents are two examples of popular milestones. It's unlikely that any of these would be on our list of typical gift-giving events or recipients, yet in Chinese society, it is. Adjust your present to fit the situation and the connection (both personal and professional).

    You Can Expect A Soft No At First: In Chinese culture, it's anticipated that the receiver would first reply "no." Similarly, you'll be required to decline a present before you accept it.

    Gifts of all types are accepted since it's part of how people are taught to receive them. It's not meant as a rejection or a nasty gesture. The recipient will happily accept the present if you just re-offer it. If not, or if the denial is adamant, the recipient may be unwilling to take the present because they are uncomfortable with it. Don't try to compel them to accept it; respect their wishes.

    When presenting a gift to a recipient (large or little), use both hands instead than just one. Sign that you are giving something of value to someone you admire.

    When accepting a present, you should also do this. Use both hands while giving and receiving presents. Be honest with one another. Giving and receiving respect is symbolized by this.

    Remove the price tag before delivering the gift in Chinese culture: This may be something you're accustomed to hearing in other cultures, but it is very significant in Chinese culture.

    It's considered rude to let the receiver know "how much" you value them numerically. Remove any promotional materials you may have included (as in, anything from the shop from which you bought it).

    A clock (or watch, for that matter) should never be presented as a gift in Chinese culture, despite the fact that it is common in Western workplaces to do so.

    When spoken aloud, it's a negative omen for running out of time and is most feared by the elderly, for whom it's a sign of impending doom. To offer a clock as a gift is a bad idea.

    Gift-giving may seem to be a complex labyrinth of laws and regulations, but it isn't. So that you may be prepared when the time comes and offer the correct sort of present, with suitable expectations and etiquette, here are just some basic norms to be aware of. It will mean a lot to the receiver to know that you took the time and effort to learn about Chinese gift giving traditions, in addition to providing you more self-assurance in your choices and selections. As a symbol of high respect, this alone will have a beneficial effect on the receiver.